Author Topic: The FA, kids & crowds  (Read 1183 times)

Offline sbahnhof

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
The FA, kids & crowds
« on: July 17, 2017, 10:06:25 AM »

Why the FA's promotional strategy needs to change, and how:


Kids Go Free: Why Branding Women’s Football as ‘Family-Friendly’ may do more Harm than Good
Ceylon Hickman discusses how the FA Women’s Football Strategy targets the wrong audience in the attempt to grow the game.

- ateamofjohnosheas.com/2017/07/14/kids-go-free-why-branding-womens-football-as-family-friendly-may-do-more-harm-than-good/



This article seems to address something that's been bubbling under for years. But what do you think? What is the family/non-family split like at games you've seen? And what is your recommendation to improve the match atmosphere?
-

coey

  • Guest
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2017, 02:27:51 PM »
if u have season ticket for the male counterpart of the club , then you get free access to womens games , does this happen up north over the equator..
do the clubs work hard with girls grass roots clubs/teams ? do they ever do community work up north ?

players seem to be invisible .
Still best to happen in the summer.

Offline sbahnhof

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
    • View Profile
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2017, 11:00:01 AM »

Relevant to this subject:

I preferred watching the ladies game before it went WSL- it was a pleasure to watch but now its gradually getting like the men's game, cut throat commercialism. Play acting is creeping in and arguing with refs was evident in this tournament [the Euros] but on the whole the players give 100% and try to play honestly .You can still stand next to opposing fans at matches and enjoy friendly banter without any argy bargy or getting a bottle thrown at you- Dont go much for Man City fans having said that- they make a constant din through out the game- and it is just a loud racket that diminishes any enjoyment.

So, they're... noisy during a match?

Cabbages

  • Guest
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2017, 07:11:33 PM »
banging drums and yelling constantly during a match with 700 fans or so is not conducive to an enjoyable experience. I had the England band in my ear when USA played at Mk and had to move. Some people like it but it aint for me.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 07:13:11 PM by Cabbages »

Cabbages

  • Guest
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2017, 07:14:43 PM »
the atmosphere during holland v England was very quiet at times- i heard when Samsom ripped his shirt....

Offline ILoveIzzy

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 01:49:03 PM »
Looks like a while since the last post, but I couldnt agree more with the article. Whichever gender the players are, football Is a predominantly male sport and culture. To grow the game, the primary target market must be the same people who turn up to matches in the mens game. Thats who watches football. If young women also turn up, then, terrific!

The last womens match I was at, as a man I sort of really didnt want to be there. The kids made me uncomfortable, the mothers made me uncomfortable, and I realised why the lads dont want to go to matches (specifically going there as opposed to watching it on TV/online). We want to chant, swear, drink beer, whatever, like we do in the mens game. And the spectators werent football fans - it was quiet, and if you shouted encouragement it sounded almost out of place!

No proper football supporters want to be trapped in that environment. And when Lucia Bronze came on, she smiled at me, seeming to appreciate my encouragement/Bronzermania, cos I was the only one who cheered. If football supporters are going to attend, they need to feel as comfortable and unified as they do at male matches.

Offline croc

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
    • View Profile
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2018, 12:30:09 PM »
The only top level womens team I've been to watch is Notts County and given the lack of crowd I didn't find it particularly family focused.   There were a few people used to sing/chant and I didn't feel particularly out of place shouting but then Notts was quite a big stand so in a way you are a bit more anonymous, plus I only went to evening games which may have meant fewer young kids?

On the whole though I agree I don't want to watch football feeling it's too family friendly.   I'd want to feel comfortable having a drink and shouting out some direct encouragement, not foul language but I'd want to act as I would at a mens non-league match.   

Related story there is a guy set up a fans blog/facebook/twitter thing for my local WPL side.   He's upset the club with some of his comments bit from the outside the club seems very thin skinned.  If you read their own social media stuff it's relentlessly positive about how well run they are etc etc but the reality is they have finished mid to lower table year after year which for a side woth anCoE/RTC to draw on I think is poor.    I saw a Yeovil coach complaining on facebook about Arsenal's programme notes being "disrespectful" - I mean this is competitive sport does everything have to be so nicey nicey? 

Offline sylvain

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 485
    • View Profile
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2018, 04:46:22 PM »
  I saw a Yeovil coach complaining on facebook about Arsenal's programme notes being "disrespectful" - I mean this is competitive sport does everything have to be so nicey nicey?
I think, that's what differentiate women's football and men's football.
There is a lot of darker stuff around like the Sampson/Aluko/sleeping with players incident, but it gets washed away more often than not.

Offline buzzbee

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 59
    • View Profile
Re: The FA, kids & crowds
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2018, 06:36:10 PM »
Or at least it has until now!
Women's football wants a higher profile, but that comes at a price! National news papers won't give good column inches, without looking to dig up dirt! The more good publicity we get, the more those in good positions will get targeted by the press

I'm sure that's why there was such a reluctance by some candidates to take on the England role!

Gareth Southgate and Philip Neville have been in the public eye for many years and will have had professional advisors, when it comes to dealing with the press. Meanwhile, someone like Mo Marley has never needed such advisors, because throughout her playing and management career, the women's game hasn't had to deal with that. For that reason, she may have felt she didn't want to face the possible invasion of privacy that wouldn't have happened in the days of Hope Powell and will probably happen more as the women's game's profile increases

BTW, I'm giving the above as a hypothetical example, as I don't know for sure that Mo was one of those who withdrew their interest

Sorry for going a little off topic
BUZZ BEE
If at first you don't succeed... cheat!