Author Topic: Yankey on female coaches  (Read 1161 times)

Offline sbahnhof

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Yankey on female coaches
« on: March 12, 2017, 08:00:03 AM »
An article written by Rachel Yankey for International Women's Day, about the future for female coaches in women's and men's leagues, including France's Corinne Diacre.

- http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/39184903

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I'm now part of a group of elite female players, including former England skipper Casey Stoney, and record England goalscorer Kelly Smith, who are doing their Uefa A licence.

There are many more England players who are heading down this pathway, and it points to a bright future where experienced internationals can pass their knowledge onto the next generation. [...] Despite the progress, stereotypes still exist in football and until that is broken down it will be extremely difficult for a woman to manage a top level men's team.


Yankey at Arsenal in 2015 (joshjdss)
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 09:35:03 AM by sbahnhof »

Offline croc

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Re: Yankey on female coaches
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2017, 11:04:22 AM »
Hopefully they aren't just fast tracking the star names - we can see in the mens game that the best coaches are not always the best players - Wenger, Mourinho etc.   If a lesser known player went into coaching would they be doing their UEFA A so quickly?   

That said good luck to her she was a fantastic player and the kind people want to watch.   Saw her play or Arsenal vs Notts and for my money she was the best player on the pit h despite I think already having been discarded by England. 

Offline sylvain

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Re: Yankey on female coaches
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2017, 01:49:45 PM »
I don't think they are fast tracking them, I know Kelly and Casey were already coaching back in the mid-end 2000's at the Arsenal and Chelsea Academies.
And Yanks has been coaching for years. I think the cost for the UEFA A is a big problem and that's were good coaches need help.

"The standard cost of the UEFA ‘A’ licence is €530 in Germany, €1,200 in Spain, €2,350 in Ireland and £4,390 in England. Attaining the ‘Pro’ licence can cost €7,550 in Ireland and £7,595 in England (figures should be treated with caution as they vary across sources). Also, the courses are relatively time consuming. Under the FAI’s programme, the Pro licence requires 250 contact hours over two years, while the A licence requires 270 contact hours. As well as this, lower coaching licences are pre-requisites for higher licences, so attaining a Pro licence can require a significant time and money outlay. "

http://www.sportseconomics.org/sports-economics/are-uefa-coaching-licences-too-expensive

Offline sbahnhof

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Re: Yankey on female coaches
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2017, 09:39:20 AM »

Another article about female coaching:

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Liverpool’s leading lady, Vicky Jepson, knows what it’s like to feel alone. Of the 36 coaches Vicky Jepson delivered a football coaching course to in Shenzhen last week, only one was female.

“It just goes to show that we are still a minority,” said the Liverpool Football Club Ladies coach. “There are still not enough female coaches in Hong Kong and Asia.”

Jepson was in town for the Premier League Asia Trophy and a women’s coaching programme organised by the Hong Kong Football Association (HKFA) and Premier Skills.

(Archived article here)
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Offline sbahnhof

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Re: Yankey on female coaches
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2017, 09:04:45 AM »

Er, thanks Wenger, kind of:

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[Asked about female managers:] "I'm personally convinced that will happen soon.

"I'm convinced in 10 or 15 years it will not necessarily be a football specialist who is a manager of a club. You will have so many scientists around the team that who will bring out the team to play on Saturday will be more management specialists than football specialists.

"[This is] Because the football decisions will be made by technological analysis."


So, robot managers, definitely. A woman as a football specialist, er ??? unthinkable apparently? Still, thanks Wenger for trying harder than some others...



Sarina Wiegman's victory with the Netherlands in Euro 2017 could launch other female coaches into the men's game:

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Wiegman – who oversaw her country’s 3-0 Euro 2017 semi-final win against England – completed a year’s internship as a coach with Sparta Rotterdam’s senior men’s teams after becoming the third woman in the Netherlands to gain the pro licence qualification. She subsequently served as assistant manager of the club’s B side and continues to combine her national role with involvement in Sparta’s academy.