Author Topic: The World Cup 2015  (Read 26403 times)

Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #240 on: June 23, 2015, 04:32:26 AM »
In retrospect it was deja vu of the Germany game from the other side of the coin.  In the first half Norway were physically and mentally mindblowing.  They were absolutely world class.  They used the full width of the field and dominated in both directions.  The problem was when England equalized, like they did against Germany, they paid for their incredible first half.  In the last 20 minutes when it was the time to increase the work rate they had nothing in the tank.  They could barely win a ball, the English were first to everything.  They were completely gassed.

It's a tough way to lose when you play so exceptional and fall victim to a thunderstrike from distance like that.

I had another eerie sense of deja vu when the whistle blew at 45' and a number of the English jogged off while the Norwegians walked slowly and alone.  It was from Jessheim last summer.

If Japan win tomorrow then the Netherlands, the Swiss, the Swedes and Norway would all have gone out in the 16.  There is a reference to playoffs or a mini-tournament for Europe's Olympic entry in Feb/Mar 2016 if required.  France and Germany have locked qualification by going to the quarters.  I've tried to find the rules and if the four above would compete for the third Olympic spot, but I can't find anything.

Offline Alan

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England 2 Norway 1
« Reply #241 on: June 23, 2015, 09:35:56 AM »
A very effective England turned 0-1 into 2-1 against Norway and took the quarter final place, while Norway's adventure is over for this time.

A positive Norway side controlled large parts of the match and it was fully deserved when Solveig Gulbrandsen sent them into the lead after 54 minutes.  After that England struck back powerfully, first by scoring from their first chance in the match seven minutes after Norway's goal, and then they turned things round with a tremendous shot from Lucy Bronze.

"It feels very tough, perhaps a little unfair just now, but this is what we were here for.  We did not manage to control the latter part of the second half and the English players turned the match to their advantage", said Even Pellerud to NRK afterwards.

Solveig Gulbrandsen was also disappointed.  "Very disappointed.  We had the chance today and I think we played well.  But you have to score in the good periods and we didn't do that.  Hopeless", she said.  "In a way it feels unfair after the first half, but in the second half we were not smart enough and we have to say they deserved it because they scored more goals".

Trine Rønning was substitued at half time with the score at 0-0.  Norway's captain was obviously disappointed after their exit but was also able to look forward.  "We are a team with many new players who have not been to a championship before.  This is a good foundation to build on.  We're not ashamed of what we did today.  We played our best match here against an opponent we really should have beaten.  That's why it feels extra bitter.  It might have been better if we had lot 3-0 because we would not have been so close to winning.  That's the feeling that is so disappointing just now", said Norway's skipper.

England 2 Norway 1 (0-0), World Cup 1/8 final, Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa, 22-06-2015
Referee: Esther Staubli, Switzerland
Cards: none
Goals: 0-1 Solveig Gulbrandsen 54, 1-1 Steph Houghton 61, 2-1 Lucy Bronze 76.

Norway:
Ingrid Hjelmseth -
Maren Mjelde, Trine Rønning (Maria Thorisdottir 46), Marita Skammelsrud Lund, Ingrid Moe Wold (Lisa-Marie Utland 86) -
Solveig Gulbrandsen, Lene Mykjåland, Gry Tofte Ims -
Kristine Minde (Elise Thorsnes 69), Isabell Herlovsen, Ada Hegerberg.

Mathias Tjøtta Odden http://www.fotball.no/Landslag_og_toppfotball/Landslag/A-kvinner/2015/Disse-skal-ta-Norge-til-kvartfinale/

Highlights: http://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/matches/round=268032/match=300269463/index.html#nosticky


Fantastic shot sinks Norway

Even Pellerud and Ingrid Hjelmseth were disappointed that Lucy Bronze's strike that gave England the lead on Monday.

"How often does that kind of shot connect? not often, but it happened today and unfortunately it was against us.  We must give her all the credit that she managed to score with that shot.  But we should have stopped her.  We were ready for it because we were lying back in a 4-5-1 formation.  We were correctly set up but we failed to defend", said Pellerud.

Ingrid Hjelmseth was also disappointed.  "It's disappointing.  But I have said the same right through the tournament.  Many people shoot and we must start to defend", she said.

"Could you have done anything different?" - "As a keeper you always have a chance of saving a shot.  You move a little to the side when she shoots and then the ball comes to where you were.  I was a bit late", she said.

Norway wasted several big chances especially in the first half when they dominated.  Ada Hegerberg and Isabell Herlovsen were played through but did not manage to score.  "I don't know what I could have done differently.  She is a tall keeper and I tried to put the ball to the side.  Then I had a free kick against me which I didn't agree with", said Herlovsen.

Hegerberg had no good reason for the reason that she did not score from her chances.  "It was tough physically today.  I tried to come to as many chances as possible, but it was as it was", she said.  "The team must function better but we had good chances and that's why it's so disappointing that we lost in this way".    

Yasmin Sunde Hoel
Article and video clip: http://www.nrk.no/sport/fotball/_-hvor-ofte-treffer-man-pa-en-sann_-1.12422979

Norway's third keeper and youngest squad member with Isabell Herlovsen after the match:

« Last Edit: June 23, 2015, 06:26:32 PM by Alan »
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Offline Alan

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How Sampson planned England's win
« Reply #242 on: June 23, 2015, 05:02:35 PM »
England's trainer Mark Sampson said his team won yesterday after they decided to take Lene Mykjåland out of the game.

On NRK-TV Tom Nordlie was critical that the trainers did not notice the pressure on their midfielder who had been their best player before half time.  Mykjåland was well and truly eliminated from the play.  

Sampson took time to praise the midfielder after the match.  "Mykjåland is a fantastic player.  World class", he told NRK.  Lene Mykjåland was more brilliant than ever before and was the brains behind Norway's many good attacks - in the first half.

Sampson told NRK that one of his most important decisions in securing the win was put a 'stamp' on Mykjåland in the second half.  "We gave her far too much room in the first half.  We had to reduce the time she had with the ball and set up pressure on her.  That was decisive", said the trainer.

Mykjåland herself said that she expected this to happen.  "We talked about it in the locker-room.  We definitely did not expect the same England team to run out after half time", she said.

"They say they expected it but England managed to take Mykjåland out.  I felt they took out Norway's General", he said.  "One idea would have been to shift her up the pitch and bring Solveig Gulbrandsen back", said Nordlie.

Even Pellerud would not comment on why Norway were less effective in the second half.  "I don't want to stand and analyse the match now", he said.

After the match Mykjåland was asked whether the tactics in the midfield could have been different in the second half.  "We could perhaps have done some things differently because we knew there would be less room.  Perhaps we should have had two deep midfielders.  It's difficult to say.  It isn't easy to predict what will happen in the second half", she said.

"How do you see the difference between the halves?" - "I was taken out more in the second half.  It's difficult to know how to deal with that.  But the space was different and it was difficult to get the ball.  It was a totally different half", she admitted.

Nordlie said the team had lost their powers with the 1-1 equaliser.  "There was high excitement and they did not manage to keep the pressure up.  The biggest thing was Mykjåland being taken out.  In the first half we were able to play through the midfield", he said.

Yasmin Sunde Hoel
Article and interview: http://www.nrk.no/sport/fotball/england-treneren_-_-avgjorende-at-vi-tok-ut-mykjaland-1.12422976
« Last Edit: June 23, 2015, 05:04:13 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #243 on: June 23, 2015, 07:02:45 PM »
Bah humbug.  Sampson and Nordlie need to stop stroking their egos.  Norway's women came out stunningly sensational as a team in the first 45' - every last player.  They completely dominated in both directions - on every square metre of the field.  I have been the biggest Lene Mykjåland fan for years and she played great yesterday, but saying the first half or the result was attributed to her is simply ridiculous.

Offline Alan

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Olympic hopes
« Reply #244 on: June 24, 2015, 09:33:49 AM »
Norway's loss to England means the end of their World Cup campaign, but their hopes of reaching the Rio Olympics are still alive.

Yesterday Japan eliminated Netherlands who join Sweden, Switzerland and Norway as the four European nations who have fallen in the round of 16.  They could now enter a playoff for the remaining Olympic place.  The winner will make up Europe's quota of nations at Rio.

Bjarne Berntsen, NFF vice president and the leader of the Norwegian delegation in Canada, was in the stands in Ottawa for the Norway-England match.  "It isn't clear yet how a playoff would be conducted.  There could be some opportunities in the autumn but it could also take place at the Algarve Cup in the winter", he said.

At present only two nations are definitely in the 2016 Olympics: the hosts Brazil and the winner of the Copa America, Colombia.  Norway last took part in the Olympics in 2008 when Berntsen led the women's team and they lost 1-2 to Brazil in the quarter final.

Jostein Overvik, Trond Johannessen http://www.vg.no/sport/fotball/kvinnefotball/slik-kan-norge-likevel-komme-til-ol/a/23475471/
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 04:48:38 PM by Alan »
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Offline Alan

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World Cup summing up
« Reply #245 on: June 24, 2015, 09:34:53 AM »
There were many suited NFF executives at Lansdowne Stadium on Monday night to console the downcast players after their elimination by England.  Now they need more than consolation.  President, general secretary and top football chief must deliver on their promises: more resources for women's football.

The NFF has put a lot of effort into marketing the World Cup.  There have been warm words on the team as a 'great product', and if it had been a championship for smiling, fun-loving, modest and straightforward types Norway would have won gold.  The players presented themselves well before and during the event and it is not difficult to sympathise with them now it's over.

Team captain Trine Rønning emphasizes that she is very pleased with the NFF's efforts in the World Cup, but she said that it almost all the clubs in the Toppserien need strengthening.  That is where the players are developed and delived to the national team system.  The conditions need improvement at the local level for the best players and the focus on developing talent must be even more intense.

The NFF deserves praise for no longer talking about men's and women's football and now just talks about developing footballers: that's a good start.

At this World Cup we have seen technically good Colombian players, many of them studying and developing in the USA.  We have seen African nations at the start of something big, and the Matildas have sent the Brazilians home.  In the USA and Canada players are developed regardless of sex, Japan is near the top and the Netherlands and Switzerland are waking up.  France and Germany have the world's best clubs with powerful finance behind them.  This is the landscape that Norway finds itself in, and it is not going to be easy.

It must be said that Norway is keeping up very well and there are many exciting types coming up: Hegerberg and Graham Hansen are stars in big leagues.  Thorisdottir has made a breakthrough in Canada.  Mykjåland is only 28 and Mjelde could be even better as a midfielder.  The foundations are there but we still need players who are better with the ball and who are given the chance to use their skills.

At this tournament the Norwegian players must admit that they did not manage to outplay the Ivory Coast and they failed to capitalise on an enormous superiority in the first half over a not too impressive England team.  You can talk about missed chances but there were not that many.  All too often Norway gave the ball away far too easily.

I notice that top football chief Nils Johan Semb said to the NFF's web site that the future looks good, and he could be right.  Let's hope he can use his powers to create the best possible conditions for the women's team.  It seemed he was ready for the challenge when the disappointed team left Landsowne Stadium for the last time.

Norway could and should have beaten England.  Norway would also have had a good chance against Canada in a quarter final, and I think Even Pellerud did right to stick to his old 4-5-1 formula at this tournament.  And obviously, Pellerud is allowed one slip up.

Ada Hegerberg is one of the most exciting players Norway has.  She must not be run ragged as a defensive winger for the rest of her international career.  Caroline Graham Hansen must use her technical skills.  Lene Mykjåland has never been better: "I think we must play more football than we do.  Teams are so good now that it's easy for them to deal with the long ball.  I think we must aim for more possession", she said.

The stadium will not be full next time Mykjåland and LSK meet Arna-Bjørnar away in the next Toppserien round.  Finance will still not come raining in.  So it's going to cost if Norway is going to keep up, but the payoff could be big.

Because the women's national team is a good product.

Trond Johannessen http://www.vg.no/sport/fotball/kvinnefotball/nff-maa-se-lenger-frem-enn-ol/a/23476208/  
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 04:48:55 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #246 on: June 24, 2015, 12:34:25 PM »
Pellerud is allowed one slip-up?  Do Norway even qualify for the tournament if he isn't coaching?

Quote
Teams are so good now that it's easy for them to deal with the long ball.  I think we must aim for more possession", she said.

Long ball is a term from England decades ago.  Norway played direct, and now play more transition.  Sweden are a good example of a possession team that did not win a game.  The Dutch play a great possession game and will only get better, and they couldn't even get the ball out of their half last night.  It was horribly painful to watch.  I called two long-time women's coaches watching it and both said they fell asleep.  I doubt there was a person in the hundreds of millions watching that wasn't saying "geez you have two amazing strikers, would you just give them the ball."  Watching a team behind on the scoreboard spend the large majority of the game passing the ball between their defenders and goalkeeper (and killing the clock doing it) is a unique combination of sadism and masochism.

Norway produces great players.  The Mjelde's, the Hansen's and Hegerberg's, the Mykjåland's.  Can they use more?  Of course.  This was the problem Pellerud had in Canada, he never had 11 quality players, he was lucky to have half a team.  

Player for player Norway will never compete with the top 10 in the world.  The USA has about 20 cities that alone are bigger than the entire country.  Germany and France are examples of countries with gene pool and the money to capitalise on it.  Norway isn't Brazil.  The way Norway medals in majors is being razor-sharp at identifying and keeping talented young girls in the game, world class development to age 16-18, great federation support and and great coaching.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 12:36:10 PM by law10 »

Offline Alan

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #247 on: June 24, 2015, 12:57:54 PM »
I think Lene might have meant, "we need to try to give the ball away less" :).  Norway played a brilliant hour of football and had one goal to show for it, England scored two on a couple of streaky chances when defenders found the back of the net.  Goals are what counts and it's the random element of it that gives sport its edge.  But Norway need to analyse both England's goals to see if there are any lessons.  I would say, if you are defending the far post you should stay there, is one lesson that could be learned :).  

I was surprised not to see Haavi on the pitch in the England match.  Looking at the 'top clubs in Europe', Norway has three players in them if we include Lyon, Wolfsburg and Munich, but only one of them played all the matches at the World Cup.  We know why Caroline Graham Hansen wasn't there but no-one has explained exactly why Nora Holstad Berge was left on the bench.  So there are questions about the use of Norway's admittedly thin resources.        

I haven't seen Japan/Netherlands yet because it was on here at 3 am.  From your description it seems not a brilliant match, running the clock down when you are losing is not the best tactic when you have Martins, Melis and Miedema.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 02:48:40 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #248 on: June 24, 2015, 01:33:05 PM »
If that's what she meant, definitely.  In the first half it wasn't much of an issue, the players made good decisions.  In the second it was a different story.  I guess the trick is executing well when you are fatigued and under pressure to produce a goal.  Which is a good time to say Ada Hegerberg did it for 90 minutes per game, and could probably do it all day.

Offline Alan

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #249 on: June 24, 2015, 01:35:01 PM »
If that's what she meant, definitely.  In the first half it wasn't much of an issue, the players made good decisions.  In the second it was a different story.  I guess the trick is executing well when you are fatigued and under pressure to produce a goal.  Which is a good time to say Ada Hegerberg did it for 90 minutes per game, and could probably do it all day.
That is also something all the players in the side that takes this World Cup will be able to do :).
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Offline Alan

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Solveig Gulbrandsen - thoughts on the World Cup I
« Reply #250 on: July 03, 2015, 03:57:41 PM »
Norway's World Cup is over and Solveig Gulbrandsen is back home at Kolbotn.  A World Cup that brought the team more attention than ever before, a tournament in which the 34-year-old scored two goals and made two assists.  But after the smooth road through the group came the rocky path, with defeat to semifinalists England.

It was a thoughtful Solveig Gulbrandsen who looked over Sofiemyr Stadium.  Her foremost thought, that Norwegian teams never manage to control matches, has caused some debate, even though she says her remarks were taken out of context.  "I have never said that we can't go on and develop as a football nation.  We must! but we do have problems with controlling matches against good international opponents, especially at A-team level where the focus is on the results.  All nations have their football culture and traditions.  I think it's important to create your own identity.  It's naive to think we can copy each other", she said.

Gulbrandsen knows what she is talking about.  Since she won Olympic gold as a 19-year-old she has been to four world-cup tournaments, three European cups, and she is four matches short of Norway's record-holder for international matches, Hege Riise.  She is a football expert for TV2 and a player developer at Wang Sports school, so she knows the subject inside out.  "If we look back at Norway's performance in international competition there are a lot of common features between the men's and women's matches", she said.  

"Rosenberg at their peak under Nils Arne Eggen, the men's team under Drillo, the women's A-team and U21 under Skullerud were all known for the system where the players were drilled in their tasks.  The team was the focus and everyone worked really hard for each other.  There was a plan for all phases of the play and a clear formation.  I think that must lie at the base.  But we must also develop our play against established defences".

Gulbrandsen was a teenager when Rosenborg were competing at the top in Europe and she admits to having been inspired by Eggen.  "I have a lot of time for what he represents.  He said in an interview once that it isn't necessary to reinvent the wheel all the time, and there I really agree with him.  We must seek to set up our own identity and build on what we are already good at.  Then obviously we can train on what we are not so good at", she said.  

"If we want to be good at something we must train for it over a period of time.  It's obviously a challenge at national team level when we have so little time together.  In the teams I have been successful with there have been clear guidelines on how we should play football.  I have been lucky enough to score goals and create results: but it isn't black and white.  For all the development along the tracks we must still train even more players who can think outside the box, who do the unexpected and unsettle our opponents.  As long as my team wins the important matches I'm happy", she said.

Gulbrandsen thinks more needs to be done for Norway to keep up in international competition.  "There has been enormous progress in the last few years both on the men's side and the women's side.  Physical training is extreme.  Technical and tactical skills are much higher.  The demands in one-to-one encounters, in defence and attack, are on a different planet altogether than before", she said.  "We must develop skills that can match the demands that meet us internationally.  What I have succeeded with here at Sofiemyr Stadium I have not succeeded with against Germany and France.  The players who are quick here at home noticed that their speed was only average at the World Cup.  We can no longer expect to run past everyone with the ball.  Technical and tactical skills are demanded as well".

So it's a concerned Gulbrandsen who is just back from her fourth World Cup.  What is needed to keep up?  Has Norway the skills to stay with the best nations in women's football?  "It will be tough.  On the men's side I think it's naive to expect that we can compete with the best in the world.  But even so we are allowed to set high standards and we must always aim to qualify for the championships.  We have been close several times.  For the women we still have a chance to be at the top but we must take a grip now".

"The challenges for Norwegian football are complex.  I really need a book", said Solveig Gulbrandsen.   (more below)
  
http://kolbotnkvinnefotball.no/Hjem/?WNews=558

« Last Edit: July 04, 2015, 02:20:11 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #251 on: July 03, 2015, 04:38:51 PM »
http://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/news/y=2015/m=7/news=three-rising-stars-one-prestigious-prize-2660394.html

Canadian centre-back Kadeisha Buchanan, Norwegian forward Ada Hegerberg and Chinese playmaker Jiali Tang have been named the three finalists for the Hyundai Young Player Award.

The TSG (FIFA Technical Study Group) will announce which of these three outstanding candidates will take home the prize on 5 July, after the Final.

Offline Alan

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Solveig Gulbrandsen - thoughts on the World Cup II
« Reply #252 on: July 04, 2015, 02:19:21 PM »
(continued from above)

"Despite everything, we know we can develop players and we have seen it with Caroline Graham Hansen and Martin Ødegaard.  Norway has several facilities that allow football to be an all-year sport, and there is a focus on training trainers for the younger teams.  Make friends, have a good social life, do well at school, take a qualification on the side, etc. etc.  But when all's said and done, most people in Norway have a great life.  There has to be an inner drive, that's essential, and we must make our young hopefuls understand that to be a top player demands training, training and more training", said Solveig Gulbrandsen.

"In some of the nations we compete against, football is simply a young person's only chance to achieve a decent life.  They live on the football field while we are at school and all the rest.  I don't think this makes it impossible but I think we have some challenges.  Those who decide to go for it should also be seen as a bit special here in Norway.  We need a raft of Carolines and Martins to create more competition".

"The Toppserien has remained unchanged since it was expanded from ten to twelve teams in 2007.  What is it like to go from the Toppserien to the world's best nations?" - "Toppserien matches compared with international matches, there is hardly any comparison.  There is an extreme difference in level.  I can almost see a crisis developing unless we can improve the Toppserien.  We just don't have enough players in Norway to have a good league for twelve teams".

Gulbrandsen has spoken about this problem frequently and is convinced that the product is weakened by having twelve teams in the top league.  "I don't think the quality is high enough.  The trainers must be better as well.  Then the clubs need the finances to create the right environment for the players.  The players spend most of their time at the clubs and that is their chief development arena.  As things are now there are only a couple of Toppserien clubs with the chance to do what is needed to professionalise women's football.  The other clubs do the best they can.  It isn't going to work if we want to compete".

"I would like to see fewer clubs in the Toppserien but a more professional environment.  That will improve the matches and also the training standard.  It's vital if we are to compete internationally", said Gulbrandsen.

"With the enormous developments there have been in physique and tempo internationally I think the medical and physio support is critical for the future.  We are lagging behind on that.  The competences must go out to the clubs and be part of the players' normal environment.  They must understand the demands and the methods we use to train to be the best".

Gulbrandsen was still sore after the loss to England in the round of 16 at the World Cup, and said it was extremely tough for everyone to go back to the hotel and pack their bags.  "We went from heaven to hell in only a few minutes.  It felt as if we had such a golden opportunity to go forward in the tournament and take a place a the Olympics.  Then we didn't take it.  I feel as if I have been on autopilot for the last few days.  We were living in a bubble and we had a quicker exit than I was hoping for", she said.

"It's good to have someone waiting for you at home.  It's fine with the children, you have no choice.  They expect me be to be the mum I always am, and they don't understand when I have jet-lag and really want to go and lie down.  You just have to turn out", said Solveig Gulbrandsen with a smile.
  
http://kolbotnkvinnefotball.no/Hjem/?WNews=558
« Last Edit: July 04, 2015, 02:24:34 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #253 on: July 05, 2015, 02:52:35 PM »
Because of it's timing being weeks ago, losing to England was seen as a major disappointment.  But that was because of the opponent and the date.  Now that the reveal has happened that result comes with a different story.  Other than France in group, Norway gave England more of a game than Germany, Japan or Canada.

Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #254 on: July 05, 2015, 03:38:13 PM »
Interesting comments from Solveig Gulbrandsen.  France are arguably playing the best football in the world, they can't drive the nail home but they certainly outplay everyone.  Their league is 12 teams and it's always the same top third with the bottom third commonly getting beat senseless.  Scores of 8-0 to 14-0 are not uncommon.

The main difference in the tale of two countries would be the professionalism money in the top couple clubs.  PSG, Lyon and Montpellier have very deep pockets.  Not an easy problem to solve.  Norway will have to be more creative.

Offline Alan

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #255 on: July 05, 2015, 05:27:55 PM »
Because of it's timing being weeks ago, losing to England was seen as a major disappointment.  But that was because of the opponent and the date.  Now that the reveal has happened that result comes with a different story.  Other than France in group, Norway gave England more of a game than Germany, Japan or Canada.
Interesting comments from Solveig Gulbrandsen.  France are arguably playing the best football in the world, they can't drive the nail home but they certainly outplay everyone.  Their league is 12 teams and it's always the same top third with the bottom third commonly getting beat senseless.  Scores of 8-0 to 14-0 are not uncommon.
The main difference in the tale of two countries would be the professionalism money in the top couple clubs.  PSG, Lyon and Montpellier have very deep pockets.  Not an easy problem to solve.  Norway will have to be more creative.
Having beaten them, England took Norway's dream path through the knockout phase.  Would they have beaten Germany yesterday? interesting question that no-one can answer :).  But it's right that Norway can feel less bad to have lost to them.  Maybe that awful first hour against Norway was what galvanised England to go on and take a medal.  

I guess the example of the French D1 shows that 12 teams, with some weaker teams in the lower places, is not necessarily a bar to achieving high quality at the top.  The positive side is that the weaker teams get to play against the stars, so something is expected to rub off.  Totally agree the top French teams play the best football to watch, even if the goals sometimes didn't happen in Canada . .    

I don't know what the lower divisions are like in France, but in Norway the top teams in division-1 have a hard time beating the bottom teams in the Toppserien.  So not only is there a big span from 1st to 12th in the Toppserien, there is also a gap down to division-1.  Where is the money best spent? in attracting top players from overseas or in improving the grass roots?

The downside in concentrating the money at the top is plain to see in the Premiership where England has a tough time finding 18 top players for the national team.  The top clubs are run by big international companies with little attachment to the country.  And Manchester United closed their women's team when the Glazers took over, because it was 'not core business'.  Their core business is: 'Engage and transact', in other words, in a nutshell, the quality-football is there to 'engage' as many 'addressable individuals' as possible so the club can 'transact' with them.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2015, 04:16:12 PM by Alan »
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Offline law10

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #256 on: July 05, 2015, 11:41:37 PM »
Quote
Where is the money best spent? in attracting top players from overseas or in improving the grass roots?

That is a very good question.  Who were the best players in Canada?  Some names would be Hegerberg, Mykjåland, Mjelde, Gulbrandsen.  Hansen had she been there.  All players that have played abroad at some point.

Perhaps if the French had a better league they would be winning major tournaments and not missing out on the medals.  Norway cannot avoid an ounce of inefficiency, the question is what is the magic number?  Ten?  Eight?  Six? 

The results this year are also pretty even though so it makes the question more blurred.  Stabæk have a 30% win rate and are one of the two main feeders of the national team, LSK are the other and have been 1-0, 1-0 and 2-0 with the bottom three teams.

I like that she's thinking about going to the next level and I'm sure a lot of other people are too.

Not sure about England or Norway but we call grassroots the 4-12 ages here.  You can never go wrong improving programs at young ages but I think they would get some good results from great programs for the elite players in the 13-16 age group before Toppserien clubs pick them up.

You can't have great programs without great program managers, great trainers, etc.  Like money, that's another tough solve.

Offline Alan

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Re: The World Cup 2015
« Reply #257 on: July 06, 2015, 04:19:59 PM »
Norway has had great results from accepting girls to play in boys' teams until they are ready to step up into division-1 or the Toppserien at 16-17.  That is a lesson that England has not learned yet.  Caroline Graham Hansen, Ada Hegerberg, Marita Skammelsrud Lund, Cecilie Fiskerstrand, to name a few.  Others from the current J16/17/19 squads.  

Marie Dølvik Markussen with the Stakkevollan boys in Tromsø:

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« Last Edit: July 06, 2015, 04:31:31 PM by Alan »
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