Author Topic: Censored Question to Women Play Sport 2013 Conference  (Read 24354 times)

Offline fairfootball

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Re: Censored Question to Women Play Sport 2013 Conference
« Reply #60 on: February 17, 2014, 11:05:02 AM »
So to summarise:
  • You have no proof that any spectator or player would regard the "look and feel" as similar to football. You believe it should. Everyone else (as far as I can tell) who has taken the time to read it, thinks it won't. So we'll agree to disagree until any practical assessment, however informal, is done. Good luck finding someone to do that and I look forward to hearing the results.
  • Football is the most popular participation sport (team or otherwise) both in this country and worldwide for women & girls. The only thing we do appear to agree about is that we would both like to see this participation increase still further. So we'll agree to disagree that changing the rules is the most effective way of achieving this. However, if the feedback from the practical assessment above is positive then I would be delighted to be proved wrong.

From the tone of your reply you appear to be ‘signing-off’ from this posting.

  I am sorry that you felt that you were unable to give a rational evaluation of the working practicalities of FairFootball, as I would have welcomed  constructive comments from someone with such a rich experience of girls’ football.  Also I realise how difficult it is to accept new, challengingly radical ideas, from an outsider - so thank you for affording me the opportunity to explain to other readers what a fantastic concept FairFootball represents; giving women and schoolgirl footballers the information to make impartial, reasoned assessments for themselves, free from vested, narrow-minded preconceptions.

Offline fairfootball

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Re: Censored Question to Women Play Sport 2013 Conference
« Reply #61 on: February 17, 2014, 11:24:13 AM »
Just a quick couple of questions to the topic starter (apologies for skim reading the whole thing):

Am I right in understanding that you want equality legislation in place to force boys to play football with girls if the girls want to and the boys don't?

I say this as a mother, aunt and carer of all boys, except for one girl, who would have rather never played football again if someone tried to force them against their will to play something that they found emotionally disturbing and physically retarding

So are you saying you want rights for one sex at the expense of another, ergo: discrimination?

Whilst I understand the point you are making, I cannot (and I believe the vast majority would not) agree with you.  To follow your logic then children would be segregated in all subject areas.  As the father of both genders I would have preferred that my children learned about, appreciated, and respected the emotional and physical differences of the opposite sex during supervised sports rather than the hidden confines behind the proverbial bike sheds.
 
However you have a perfectly valid argument.  There can be vast physical and emotional developmental differences during puberty, not only between the genders, but also between individuals of the same gender.  That is the reason why I developed the idea of FairFootball ( www.fairfootball.co.uk ) which would allow teachers to go some way in  accommodating ability concerns between the genders - or amongst each gender, depending on the circumstances.

I’m sorry, but I think that selective equality is a nonsense, but I hope that I have gone some way in reconciling our differences by proposing a compromise solution that, not only addresses your points, but also opens-up the prospect of an improved game of football for everyone.

Offline BillyBoy

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Re: Censored Question to Women Play Sport 2013 Conference
« Reply #62 on: February 19, 2014, 07:50:07 PM »
I don't know if you've ever seen this Telegraph article, and it is different from your 'vision' Fairfootball, but I thought you might find it interesting. There is also another article from Dr Lawson on the website. You may be able to use these academics as a potential channel for your ideas.

Splitting school PE lessons by gender 'damages girls'

An academic calls for gender-neutral PE lessons, insisting the traditional vision of football for boys and netball for girls is fuelling gender stereotypes in later life.

Teachers should stop segregating boys and girls in PE lessons because school sport is fuelling gender “prejudice” in later life, an academic has warned.

Pupils should be given equal access to all sports and take part in mixed competitions to stop girls being pigeonholed as weak, it was claimed.

Sian Lawson, senior lecturer in sports coaching at Northumbria University, suggested that segregated PE lessons were an “historic hangover from Victorian values” that see boys and girls as having different needs.

She insisted there was no physical reason to view “female bones as more breakable or girls more fragile when given the same level of exercise”.

Many teachers justify pushing girls into netball and boys towards football to avoid sexual harassment or discrimination.

But Dr Lawson said the “controlled environment” of the school playing field was the “best opportunity these potential adults have to learn to respect each other”.

The comments come amid a continuing debate over standards of childhood exercise and physical activity, particularly among girls.

Research published earlier this month by the University of Pennsylvania found that the brains of men and women were wired up differently which could explain some stereotypical male and female behaviour.

But Dr Lawson said many differences were down to cultural reasons, with school sport acting as one of the key barriers to equality.

“If everyone trains and competes on equal terms, the biologically slower can up their game, and if the fast naturally rise to the top no one should object,” she said. “If we aspire to believe in individual variation over stereotyping, and equality of opportunity, then why not let our children start with that?”

Research from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in the summer found a quarter of girls aged five to 10 had not taken part in any sport over in the previous month – a rise of almost 50 per cent in five years.

Separate research by the Women's Sport and Fitness Foundation revealed that just over half of girls – 51 per cent – are put off physical activity by their experiences of school sport and PE lessons.

But Dr Lawson insisted that the subject could be used to actually break down barriers between the sexes.

Writing for Telegraph.co.uk, Dr Lawson quoted a Northumbria University study that found no physical distinction in the coaching required for elite male and female athletes.

She said: “There’s no physiological reason why boys should play football and girls rounders, indeed in the USA soccer is a ‘girls sport’ and baseball is ‘for boys’.

“Even within the traditionally male sports women are now showing that they can compete on equal terms, despite typically receiving less training.”

Dr Lawson added: “As an anatomist I haven't yet found a reason to see young female bones as more breakable or girls more fragile when given the same level of exercise.

“In schools we’ve already created a fairly even group by dividing children into age-based classes. More to the point we don’t segregate the class on the basis of height or strength, we segregate for gender.

“The idea of women as unambiguously weaker is so deeply ingrained that sometimes we don’t notice that we’ve made that assumption. Here we are teaching that idea to children, without questioning it ourselves.”

But the comments were branded “absurd” by traditionalists who insisted parents would be “horrified” by the idea of joint lessons.

Chris McGovern, a former independent school headmaster and chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, said: “It’s just political correctness. There are clear physiological differences between boys and girls.

“It’s possible to mix them in the early primary years but it’s just commonsense to split them when they get older and you’ve having full blown tackles in rugby and football because boys are stronger. It’s an absurd idea and it will horrify parents.”

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10528867/Splitting-school-PE-lessons-by-gender-damages-girls.html


Offline fairfootball

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Re: Censored Question to Women Play Sport 2013 Conference
« Reply #63 on: February 20, 2014, 11:19:55 AM »
As you probably gather I’m more of a pragmatist than a purist, so I do not fully agree with Sian Lawson’s views, but rest assured I shall certainly be getting in touch with her.  Thank you for the link - I  much appreciate your help and  impartiality.