Author Topic: C.O.E. Selection Policy  (Read 14678 times)

Offline andydinger

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #80 on: June 30, 2014, 11:10:56 AM »
As both a coach & a parent I recognise the issues and frustrations both face. The single most important thing to reconcile these is communication. Unfortunately this is often where CoEs and many other coaching organisations are weakest. A coach can be great on the training ground and a brilliant match tactician but will ultimately not be the best they can be if they fail to motivate (communicate with) their players. At junior level, especially CoEs, the parents are an important part of a player's motivation but not all CoE coaches and Directors treat them that way. The "necessary evil / taxi service" mentality is unfortunately far too commonplace.

What a lot of coaches forget is that winning and losing is often far more important to parents than to players. The players will be personally involved in the game and will experience the personal development. Parents on the other hand often only see statistical things like goals, clean sheets, results, league position, minutes on the pitch, etc. Where the development ethos is shared with the players but not with the parents, the latter get all upset and negative which affects the performance of the former. My solution: you can never talk enough...!

Offline footypops

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #81 on: July 03, 2014, 08:19:34 AM »
For my part I dont think the coaching qualification level was the issue. The GK coach hardly turned up. A COE must provide specific GK coaching at least 1 hour per week (from memory). This did NOT happen. Both the U17s keepers last year sought out GK training from other teams.
So - in a nutshell;
No support after an injury which need a spinal board (she was terrified); the coach admitted that they never even considered the pyshological effect. - worth noting that the support from the physio at the time (who was also forced out) was spot on. The physios who are there now are also a credit.
No regular specific GK coaching, forcing the GKs to look elsewhere for training. In 20/20 hindsight, going back to that Centre was the biggest mistake made. She would have been far happier going to another team she had trials for.

Offline #1

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #82 on: July 03, 2014, 12:43:41 PM »
3 words  - Swept. Under. Carpet.
Tbh its disappointing to see this. The centre involved may disappear next year anyway. As far as I know the COE licences are extended for this season. After then, I wouldnt be surprised in the slightest if any COE not formally tied up with a WSL side will be dropped of the list (hence the recent formal connection between North Yorkshire and Doncaster Belles). Conjecture? Perhaps.... Wide of the mark? Maybe.... Possibility? This is the FA; anything can happen.

Offline InterestedParty

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #83 on: July 04, 2014, 02:35:36 PM »
One reason given for the reduction of Centres three-years ago was the lack of talent; surely awarding COE licenses to WSL clubs given their geographical spread would contradict this. Personally I am watching with interest to see what happens with the south west pilot. Could more ACCs be introduced and club junior teams linked to WSL/FAWPL clubs be placed in a new league programme? When the likes of Charlton, Reading, Watford etc lost their COE license, they retained their junior teams. Would allow more players currently excluded from consideration to access national youth squads. Why should a The FA fund the junior programmes of clubs with COE status? With or without it, the likes of Arsenal, Aston Villa, Bristol, Chelsea etc would still run youth teams!

Offline andy hull

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #84 on: July 04, 2014, 06:12:22 PM »
One reason given for the reduction of Centres three-years ago was the lack of talent; surely awarding COE licenses to WSL clubs given their geographical spread would contradict this. Personally I am watching with interest to see what happens with the south west pilot. Could more ACCs be introduced and club junior teams linked to WSL/FAWPL clubs be placed in a new league programme? When the likes of Charlton, Reading, Watford etc lost their COE license, they retained their junior teams. Would allow more players currently excluded from consideration to access national youth squads. Why should a The FA fund the junior programmes of clubs with COE status? With or without it, the likes of Arsenal, Aston Villa, Bristol, Chelsea etc would still run youth teams!
Dont you think you would get more talent if you let the girls play for a league team on a saturday & play the CoE games on a sunday. My daughter had a trial when she was 10 but wouldnt leave her club mill lane & friends, in her 1st season has a player she scored 66 goals in 18 games.

Offline andydinger

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #85 on: July 04, 2014, 09:29:38 PM »
Dont you think you would get more talent if you let the girls play for a league team on a saturday & play the CoE games on a sunday. My daughter had a trial when she was 10 but wouldnt leave her club mill lane & friends, in her 1st season has a player she scored 66 goals in 18 games.

I know some players do play Saturday and Sunday and are quite capable of doing so. However, The FA seem to think that it makes players much more prone to overuse injuries if they do it regularly. Most CoE training/playing programmes are about as intense as youth players can cope with. It would be unfair on most kids to put them under the pressure of feeling like they are letting one or the other team down if they have to rest for one of the games in a weekend.

Offline bilbobaggins

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #86 on: July 04, 2014, 11:02:12 PM »
noooooo , dont play twice a week.  coe players cant play for a grass roots team anyway.

Offline Soccer dad

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #87 on: July 04, 2014, 11:14:24 PM »
My Daughter signed for a CoE last year at U15s from one of the very well known grass roots teams. She loves it, has developed through great coaching twice a week and a match most Saturday against quality opposition. Absolutely no need to play twice a weekend and rack up the 'cricket scores' that used to happen at grass roots.

I completely understand Andy Hulls point of view. I was there a year ago. The best advice i could give is to take your daughter along to Lincoln and she should be able to trial for 6 weeks in August/September and play a couple of matches during this time. This will give both your Daughter and Lincoln a chance to see if CoE football is right for you.

One word of caution i would give however is equating 'goals scored' to talent. In my (very) brief time i have seen the 'top 5' goal scorers from the Sheffield and Hallamshire league come for trials and fail to gain a contract. I suspect that far more important is the ability to control the ball with good technical ability than that to run and shoot at goal against a poor goalkeeper. It seems to be midfielders that progress best through trials, again perhaps supporting the argument that time on the ball and technical skill win through.

Good luck with whatever you decide and i wish your daughter all the best. Remember though, that if she isn't having fun then it isn't the right choice.

Offline andy hull

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #88 on: July 05, 2014, 12:25:25 AM »
I agree with what you have said soccer dad. My quote was just an example that CoE are missing a lot of good players staying with there grass roots team, when some on this forum are saying that they have a lot of average players in some CoE teams. Her team even won the local futsol tournament a couple of years ago with the the local PDC in it which used to be the CoE.
Daughter has stopped enjoying her footy so thats why i am trying to get her some were else because it will be a waste if she gives up. She is a centre midfield player not a forward.

Offline Soccer dad

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #89 on: July 05, 2014, 08:56:42 AM »
I completely agree that there are lots of great players still at grass roots, you'll never get them all to a CoE. One reason as well though is the parental travel commitment to take the player to 2 training sessions and long distance matches on a weekend. On a wednesday and friday, we leave the house at 5 and get back at 10. I'm sure there are worse cases than this. I'd completely encourage you to take your daughter to a CoE if she is up for it. I just wanted to give my opinion that the best way was a 6 week trial outside the 'normal' june window as this tends to just be a few skills tests and match situations. If she were to trial in September then she would get 6 weeks of training and most likely a couple of Home games. During this time she can continue to play with her grass roots team also. We did it and it gave a truer taste of what it was like. The coaches were also just evaluating her rather than 30 or so trialists. I'm not sure what age your daughter is but i'd also encourage you to do it no later than U15 year 1 as i believe its incredibly hard to get into the U17 squads.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 02:53:47 PM by Soccer dad »

Offline croc

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Re: C.O.E. Selection Policy
« Reply #90 on: September 17, 2014, 12:17:02 AM »
Three players in my daughter's team are former CoE players that left voluntarily because of the commitment at under 10 and 11 level.   Two of these players were among the best in the centre and of those two the one that isn't my daughter (just to show I'm not biased) has the physical potential (pace, balance etc) to go right to the top.    I very much doubt this situation is unique and the whole system should be scrapped for something like the PDCs where the girls can stay with grass roots clubs until a more appropriate age.   

Agree with the comments about specific trials - be far better for the centres to watch games and then invite talented players to longer term try outs over several weeks.   Yes they can still have the trial dates as part of that, there may be talented girls who don't play for organised teams, especially in the younger ages where they may play for boys teams, but you can't judge players based on a couple of training sessions often with large amounts of kids taking part.   

Another thing is the emphasis on fitness work which is a complete waste of time at that age - fitness is transient and if girls playing football 3-4 times a week need extra fitness work at that age it's probably because their diet is poor which can only really be corrected by changing attitude not exercise.