Author Topic: Marta  (Read 27582 times)

Offline David

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Marta
« on: January 10, 2007, 01:00:12 PM »
World Player of the Year so a thread on Brazil's Marta seems appropriate:-

Brazil's top women's soccer player inspired by Ronaldinho

Brazil's Marta, the world's top woman soccer player, told Brazilian television on Wednesday she draws her inspiration from Ronaldinho, her compatriot who plays for Spain's Barcelona.

Soccer's governing body, the International Federation of Football Associations, nominated Marta, 20, best in the world, but gave Ronaldinho only a number three position.

"I am very inspired by Ronalinho Gaucho," said Marta, who plays for Swiss team Umea, speaking to media at Rio de Janeiro airport, where she had arrived to spend Christmas with her family.

Marta told press she had spoken with Ronaldinho ahead of the prize-giving ceremony and he had said he thought it was unlikely he would be the world's top player for a third consecutive year.

"He knew more or less what was about to happen. He was already waiting," she said. "But he is going to keep his head up and keep going. He knows his potential and knows he can climb the mountain again," said Marta, a forward.

Italy's Fabio Cannavaro won the top place and France's Zinedine Zidane was second.

Marta said that the Brazilian World Cup squad's failed campaign at the 2006 edition of the cup, in Germany, was the main reason why Ronaldinho did not win the prize a third time.

"Although I did not play that much with the national team this year, I was sure that I would win because I feel I am playing very well," said Marta, who arrived in the airport with trophy in hand to a wild welcome from her family.

Marta came third in 2004 and second in 2005. This year American Christine Lilly and Germany's Renate Lingor were second and third respectively.

http://english.people.com.cn/200612/21/eng20061221_334628.html

Offline Alan

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Marta
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2007, 09:24:20 PM »
Elected the world's top woman player at the end of 2006 by the trainers and captains of all the countries playing international women's football, Marta from Brazil is in her fourth season with Sweden's Umeå.  There are some clips of her, with some incredible moves and goals, on www.svt.se, click on play, then sport, then fotball, then Damallsvenskan, then you can try "Marta på väg att lämna Umeå" as a start.  There are interviews(in Swedish) on there, as well as some clips of Malin Moström, Hanna Ljungberg and other top Swedish players.
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Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2007, 07:44:35 PM »
Chilled to perfection


Marta is one of Brazil's best footballers - but as a woman she had to leave home to prove it. She tells Alex Bellos how she found fame and fulfilment in the far north of Europe

Sunday June 3, 2007
Observer Sport Monthly

In the 1960s, when an amateur football coach in the Brazilian city of Manaus put a girl in his team, an unexpected visitor showed up: an emissary from the Ministry of Education. He was there to remind the coach that it was forbidden by law for women to play football.
The government repealed that law in 1975, but a woman's place in football remains restricted in Brazil. In the Peladao, the country's largest amateur tournament, which has been held in Manaus since 1973, women have been allowed to take part - but only in a beauty pageant. The tournament encapsulates Brazilian attitudes to gender: for men, national identity is expressed through football; for women, through sensuality.

Even when women achieve sporting success, they are expected to conform to stereotype. Hortencia was Brazil's best ever female basketball player; she also posed nude in Playboy. Brazil has produced other world-beating sportswomen. Maria Esther Bueno won Wimbledon three times, in 1959, 1960 and 1964. Beach volleyball pair Jackie Silva and Sandra Pires became, in 1996, the first Brazilian women to win Olympic gold. Yet because of the cultural barriers against women playing football, the sport that most defines the nation, women's football has been conspicuously neglected.
Marta Vieira da Silva is Brazil's most successful female footballer. In 2006, she was voted Fifa's Women's Player of the Year and, most recently, she played in the Uefa Cup final for Umea IK, from northern Sweden, against Arsenal Ladies. Umea lost, but Marta, a striker, was outstanding, reaffirming her place as the world's best female footballer.

Rene Simoes coached Brazil's women's team at the 2004 Olympics. He compares Marta to another Brazilian centre-forward - the great Romario, with whom he has also worked. 'They are very similar,' he says. 'Whether playing dominoes, cards, or football - neither of them accepts losing.'

Simoes says Marta's technique is as good as the men's. 'Her ball control at speed is fabulous. She thinks fast. She is always scoring. I think in the history of women's football only [American] Mia Hamm has been a better player. But Marta is much more creative. And she is only 21. In two years' time, she will overtake Mia to be the best.'

Marta was born in Dois Riachos, a town in the parched north-east of Brazil with a population of about 12,000. When it rains, crops grow. When it doesn't - which is most of the time - there is little work to go round. Marta's father was a barber. He left her mother when Marta was just a baby, condemning the family - Marta has two elder brothers and a sister - to poverty and struggle. 'We didn't have enough money even to buy a football,' Marta told me, speaking in Portuguese. 'If my mum had done that we would have gone without food.'

She began to play football in the streets with local boys. When none of them had a ball, they would make one by folding up plastic bags.

The more impoverished and remote the town or village in Latin America, the more entrenched and chauvinistic the attitudes. Dois Riachos is about as remote as you can get. When Marta played football, many of the boys mocked her. 'They would insult me, say that I had no shame. Sometimes, I'd try to fight them. I might have been small but I was a tough little girl. I would get angry and let fly.'

She was often called a 'man-girl'. 'Even now in Brazil you hear comments like that,' Marta says, with a sigh. There was resistance, too, within her family. Her eldest brother was opposed to her playing what was, in effect, a game for boys. 'He had heard people slag me off, and so he wanted to protect me.'

Playing with boys did have benefits, however. Marta picked up their favourite skills - dribbling and flamboyant ball control. She developed into a creative centre-forward, perhaps the most Brazilian of all positions (her role model is Rivaldo). Last year, in a game for Umea, she picked up the ball in her own half and dribbled past six players including the goalkeeper. She then dribbled around the keeper again for a better angle, and scored.

After playing in the streets for a few years, Marta joined a five-a-side indoor team. Again, she was the only girl. And again, because she was so good she encountered more obstacles. 'I played in the local championship for two years, until another team said that they would withdraw from the tournament if I continued to play. There was a huge controversy and the championship organiser thought it would be better if I didn't play any more.' She believes 'the boys felt inferior'. Banned from playing with the boys, she joined the sole girls' team in the area, but that was shut down because of lack of funds.

Brazil has no women's national league nor a system of scouts. Some of the big clubs in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, however, have women's teams. Marta's break came when she was 14. The organiser of a local sports club had moved to Rio. 'He asked if I wanted to go for a trial, at either Fluminense or Vasco [two big Rio clubs].'

The 1,000-mile bus trip took three days. On the first day of her trial at Vasco da Gama, she was taken on. 'I was very skinny, but fast,' she says. 'I think they were shocked that a girl like me could cause such havoc on the pitch.'

At Vasco, she received expenses and lived with family friends. As Vasco formed the backbone of the national team - which had recently finished third at the 1999 World Cup, their best performance - she was one step from a national call-up.

All Brazilian footballers who make their international mark in their teens are, inevitably, compared to Pele. Like Pele in 1958, Marta was only 17 when she made her World Cup debut in 2003. Although Brazil only reached the quarter-finals, she was the tournament's sensation. One of those watching was Roland Arnqvist, manager of Umea IK. On his return to Sweden, he attempted to sign Marta. Just getting in touch with her took two months. She had no agent and spoke no English.

'Brazil is not like Europe,' says Arnqvist, 'where every house has a telephone.' Even when he made contact it was not easy. 'The first time we spoke I think she thought it was some kind of joke.' Still, she accepted Umea's terms and, on reaching 18 in February 2004, became the first Brazilian woman to play professionally in Europe.

Marta helped Umea to win the Swedish championship in 2005 and 2006. She is the best-paid female footballer in the league (she refuses to say how much she earns, although adds that it doesn't compare to the men's game) and is a much bigger star in Sweden than in Brazil - where, before she won her Fifa award, she was scarcely known at all. She speaks Swedish and feels that Umea, less than 200 miles from the Arctic Circle, is her second home. 'The cold was a challenge,' she says. 'I went from 35 degrees every day in Brazil to a place where it reaches minus 22 in the winter. But my life has always been about breaking barriers. I saw everything as a challenge.'

Before Marta, Brazil's best-known female footballer was Milene Domingues. As the ball juggling world record-holder, she used to earn money performing at events. Then she married Ronaldo. With no proper league to play in, Milene became a celebrity wife rather than a famous player in her own right. (She and Ronaldo separated in 2003.)

Jose Carlos Meihy, professor of history at the University of Sao Paulo, says that there are deep-rooted reasons why women's football is not popular in Brazil. 'The culture gives great importance to the legs - such as in football and capoeira. Yet female legs are given special attention: they are there to swing the hips and provoke men.'

Yet the perception of women's football in Brazil is beginning slowly to change. When the women's team won silver at the Athens Olympics, they briefly replaced the men on the sports pages.

In January, Americo Faria, the chief administrator of the men's national team, was also put in charge of the women's side. He has no idea how many women play in Brazil nor how many teams there are. Three of the national squad have no club. 'The problem is one of profitability,' he says. 'Our [men's] clubs have no money. Why would they spend money on something that has no visibility? Our job is to find ways of promoting women's football so that sponsors come on board.'

The good news is that macho Latin American attitudes towards the game are softening. In Manaus, the city's amateur tournament still requires all teams to have a beauty queen but, since 2005, women have also been able to take part in a parallel football competition. And while the success of Marta Vieira da Silva has drawn attention to the struggles of the women's game in Brazil, it has also revealed its potential.

· Alex Bellos is the author of Futebol, the Brazilian Way of Life (Bloomsbury)

http://football.guardian.co.uk/womensfootball/story/0,,2091424,00.html

Offline Dr Gonzo

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Re: Marta
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2007, 10:49:52 AM »
Marta is one of Brazil's best footballers - but as a woman she had to leave home to prove it.

I think most people have to leave home to be appreciated, not just woman in football.  Many films, bands, artists etc have had to go abroad to make an impression and only then to they make it on the home turf.  Don't think it does anyone much harm to leave home anyway....


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Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2007, 08:39:25 AM »
Marta sets new milestone

MARTA, FIFA's world player of the Year, and Cristiane scored two goals each as Brazil women's team thrashed the United States 5-0 to retain the Panamerican Games title today (AEST).

With the men crashing out in the group phase, Brazil's women were left to carry the torch for the football-mad nation, and didn't disappoint, delighting a crowd of nearly 70,000, the biggest to watch a women's match in Brazil.

The win avenged an overtime defeat by the Americans in the Olympic Games final in Athens in 2004, ending the tournament without conceding a goal while scoring 33.

Marta, who scored 12 goals in five games, received the ultimate honour, stepping off the pitch into a cement mould to become the first woman to be enshrined in the Maracana walk of fame alongside players such as Pele and Socrates.

"To be in the Hall of Fame with these very famous people is an honour," said Marta.

"I have had many great moments, the silver medal at the Olympics, the honour of best player but this was a very special day, it showed to the country that women's football can and does have potential."

Canada beat Mexico 2-1 to win the bronze medal

http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,8659,22143248-23215,00.html

Offline Alan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2007, 11:57:00 AM »
The World's best player has at last got a chance to show her skills in front of a home crowd.

Elected by FIFA last year as the World's best woman player, Marta has been almost unknown in her home country since she took up professional football in Sweden.  So the Pan-American games were the first chance she had of representing Brazil on home territory.  Last night she helped her team to a 5-0 victory over the USA to win the tournament.

Because of club commitments in Umeå Marta missed Brazil's first match in the tournament when they beat Uruguay 4-0, but she was there for the 5-0 win against Jamaica.  In the third match Brazil set a tournament record when they beat Ecuador 10-0.  She was named best player after that match, but her big moment came in the Canada match when she scored five goals in the team's 7-0 win over the third-best rated team in the tournament and eventual bronze winners.  In the semifinal Brazil beat Mexico 2-0.

Brazil's tournament goal difference:  33-0, with Marta scoring 12 goals in five matches.

The Brazil women have played in front of unprecedented crowds and there were nearly 68,000 at the final in the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro.

Marta and the other Brazilian players have had a lot more attention from the media than they are used to.  This does not match the coverage the men's team gets, but already the first match, when they beat Uruguay, made the front page on the country's leading paper Globo.

Marta will have divided loyalties in mid-August when the Brazil team travel to Northern Sweden for a ten-day training session leading up to the World Cup in China.  One of the attractions will be a Brazil v. Umeå friendly at the Gammliavalen stadium, but nobody is saying which side Marta will be on.

www.nrk.no and www.uik.se

« Last Edit: July 28, 2007, 09:58:53 PM by Alan »
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Offline Alan

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Offline Alan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2007, 10:52:32 AM »
A thrill for Brazil

Marta leads women's soccer team to a 5-0 victory over the U.S. in the Pan Am Games final, and the players get to experience a moment usually reserved for the men. By Philip Hersh, Special to The Times
July 27, 2007

RIO DE JANEIRO — Marta was asked question after question about what she had experienced Thursday, the thrill of a lifetime for any athlete, an utterly unexpected thrill for a woman soccer player in Brazil.

She had answered them all calmly until all of a sudden it hit her, and she burst into tears, her composure overwhelmed by too many emotions.

Who wouldn't have come unstrung after reaching apotheosis in the temple of your sport, after hearing and seeing a country that often disdains women athletes — especially women soccer players — cheer as one to acclaim what you and your team had just done?

"We showed to the country what women's soccer can do, what potential it has," she said.

Marta and her teammates, Olympic silver medalists in 2004, had just beaten an overmatched opponent, the United States Under-20 team, 5-0, in the Pan American Games soccer final in Maracana Stadium.

A crowd of 67,788, largest to see a women's match outside North America and fifth largest in the sport's history, had chanted Marta's name. When that sound stopped ringing in her ears, she heard her 21-year-old feet squish into wet plaster in the stadium's basement, where her footprints were left near those of Brazil's soccer legends, men like Pele and Garincha and Zico.

Marta's are the first female feet in the country's soccer Walk of Fame. "Of course there is prejudice [in Brazil], and that makes things much more difficult for women, not only in soccer but many other sports," she said. "We are trying to find our place.

"I hope this means there will be more Martas and Formigas [a teammate] in the future. They want to play, but we need to have much better structures established for women's soccer in Brazil."

Brazil's part-time coach, Jorge Barcellos, talked of the pressure his team felt playing at home. Left unspoken was that a defeat would have left these women as ignored and unappreciated as they always have been.

The U.S. players, stand-ins for the top U.S. team preparing for September's World Cup, were aware of the match's larger significance.

"I do think of this as a victory for women's sport in general — the stadium [nearly] filled, people chanting Marta's name, this is something none of us girls in America will get," U.S. captain Lauren Cheney said.

"I don't think I would trade this experience for anything. I am honored to have been on the field with them."

The crowd hardly cared that this was an obvious mismatch — U.S. teenagers against a Brazil team with many of the players who had lost the 2004 Olympic gold in overtime to the last of the legendary Mia Hamm-Julie Foudy U.S. teams.

"It takes a spark to catch national interest, and this could be the spark — it should be — for Brazil's women," said Rhian Wilkinson, a forward on Canada's bronze-medal team, which lost to Brazil, 7-0, in the preliminary round.

The women's national team program virtually ceased to exist over the past three years. Nearly all the top players, including Marta, went to Europe to play for club teams there.

The Brazil soccer federation hired Barcellos to coach the team at the Pan Am Games and, probably, the World Cup in China, where they will join the senior U.S. team as a favorite.

Brazil outscored six Pan Am Games opponents by an aggregate 33-0. Marta's two penalty-kick goals against the United States gave her 12 for the tournament, in which she played five of the matches.

"This Brazil team is a pleasure to watch," Canadian Coach Even Pellerud said. "It reminds me of the old generation men's teams, with brilliant players who make the game look easy."

The men gave up that style long ago, forced into pragmatic, defensive soccer by the high stakes of global soccer. The hard thing has been getting Brazilians to realize they still can see their beloved jogo bonito, the "beautiful game." Thursday, they finally came to see Marta and her teammates play it — beautifully.

Philip Hersh covers Olympic sports for The Times and the Chicago Tribune.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/soccer/la-spw-soccerbrazil27jul27,1,5590498.story?coll=la-headlines-sports-soccer
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Offline justme!

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ha...
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2007, 10:10:00 PM »
...fell over the ball in final of the women's uefa cup hehe...no I didn't laugh at her expense.


On another note she looks bloody good infront of goal  :o
Can't wait to see more of her in the WC will be really entertaining and let's hope she scores some goals like that free kick  ;D


^^ Yep - I can read the future...ha!

Offline Alan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2007, 11:33:11 AM »
Here's what a British expat called John Blake wrote:

At the recent Pan American games that were held here in Brazil it was the Brazilian women who won the gold medal at football.  They thoroughly deserved to do so.  In the final they played Canada and totally dominated the game.  It wasn't that the Canadian women were so poor but the women from Brazil played football on a different planet and won the game easily.

The Brazilian women played fast and attacking football. Great passing of the ball with real determination and energy from the first minute to the final whistle.  Their skill level and penalty taking was brilliant too.  This women's team truly entertained the millions watching.

There are several "stars" in Brazil's women team but one lady player is the GREATEST female player in the world.  Her name is MARTA and she is sensational.  Only small in size but what a fantastic player and she not only scored 12 goals in the Pan American games but ran rings around the Canadians and many other teams. Marta's skill has to be seen to be believed, and, to say she is the female Pele would be a fair comparison [and Pele agrees]. 

The performance of England's men against Germany last night shows once again that we still haven't got players and a team who can really play and WIN at international level.  It certainly would be a positive if the England manager got a recording of Brazil's women playing wonderfully entertaining and skilful football.  Unlike England's men they ARE winners !
« Last Edit: August 26, 2007, 12:18:05 PM by Alan »
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Offline redrobin

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Re: Marta
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2007, 11:48:42 PM »

Marta will have divided loyalties in mid-August when the Brazil team travel to Northern Sweden for a ten-day training session leading up to the World Cup in China.  One of the attractions will be a Brazil v. Umeå friendly at the Gammliavalen stadium, but nobody is saying which side Marta will be on.


Well, she solved that one alright, She played for them both!!

Offline Alan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2007, 11:04:05 PM »
yes, but it seems that she was careful not to run riot from either side.
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Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2007, 07:18:23 AM »
Marta the No10 marvel has style reminiscent of Pele

Not long ago I wrote a book about football's No10s, the playmakers from Puskas to Zidane who give the game its fantasy.

In the preface, apologising to the long list of those omitted from the favoured 10 (the likes of Savicevic, Cubillas, Suárez, Hagi, Litmanen, Eastham, Brady, Zico, Scifo, Rai and Valderrama), I mentioned Marta, the No 10 of the current Brazilian women's team.

Now I wish I'd given her a chapter of her own.

She scored Brazil's first and last goals when they beat China 4-0 in the women's World Cup in Wuhan on Saturday, and I mean absolutely no disrespect when I say that if you half-closed your eyes while you watched the televised highlights, you could have imagined you were watching a game between men's teams.

There was speed to go with the skill, and strength and commitment in the challenges. Marta, 21, took her goals with a panache reminiscent of Pele, the greatest No10 of all.

http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/sport/2007/09/17/sulking_alonso_will_defend_his.html

Offline Hanna Ljungberg Fan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2007, 11:21:14 AM »
If she continious play like this she can do this year in womensoccer what Pele did in men soccer in 58, 62 and 70 and what Maradona did in 86

Offline Alan

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Re: Marta
« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2007, 10:55:25 AM »
 By Sportswriter Pan Yi

    HANGZHOU, China, Sept. 27 (Xinhua) -- Brazil's world-class striker Marta showed her amazing dribbling skills, incredible quick pace and innate scoring instinct here on Thursday, helping Brazil whitewash the two-time champions United States 4-0 in the FIFA Women's World Cup semi-final.

    Marta, the FIFA best player of 2006, scored the second and the last goal for Brazil to increase her total tally to seven goals at this World Cup, topping the scorer sheet.  Few doubts that she is the top candidate for the Golden Shoe and Golden Ball awards.

    In the breath-taking duel tonight, Marta broke the US defense from the right wing and sent home a flash low shot in the 27th minute.  She also sealed the 4-0 win in the 79th minute when she thrusted into the box from the left wing, danced past two defenders and fired another flash low shot home.

    "Any game against US was tough, so it was a fantastic win and we make history," said Marta said after the match.  It was the first time for Brazil, who had not won any FIFA Women's World Cup or Olympic soccer tournament title, to advance to a World Cup final. Brazil also ended the United States' 51-game unbeaten run.

    "The whole team was full of passion. So it was a victory of the team, not myself," Marta said.  She also expressed gratitude to her partner up front Cristiane and midfielder Daniela who gave her full support on the pitch.

    "I always dream of becoming world No. 1," She noted.

    US coach Greg Ryan said, "I got two players to mark Marta. But she was fantastic."

    Before coming to China, Marta told reporters, "I just can't wait for it to start. I don't know if we'll win it, but we'll certainly be going there with the firm belief that anything is possible."

    Football may be a religion in her native country, but back in the days when the young Marta discovered her passion for the sport, girls were largely discouraged from playing, a standpoint shared by her family.  Undeterred, Marta packed her bags for Sweden in 2004. Aged just 18 and far away from her loved ones in a land where the language was alien to her and the weather even more so, the determined teenager sought to overcome the many obstacles she faced by showing just what she could do with a ball at her feet.

    Three years on, the free-scoring striker becomes a world star. As well as the glittering award she picked up in Zurich last December, the youngster has also pocketed two Pan-American Games gold medals and a silver medal at the Athens 2004 Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

    She received recognition from her compatriots at the Estadio Maracana. It was there at the temple of Brazilian football that the No.10 left her footprints in the Hall of Fame, becoming, in the process, the very first woman to line up alongside national legends such as Pele, Zico, Garrincha, Ronaldo and Romario, to name but a few.

    Marta' only weakness is perhaps in the air, standing as she does a mere 1.60 meters tall (5ft 3-1/2in).

    Marta caught people's eyes when she took part in the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship Canada 2002 at the age of 16. And a year later she was back in the global spotlight at the FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003.  Seen as a promising rookie on those occasions, by the time Athens 2004 came around she was the undisputed star of the team and the foundation of their gold medal hopes.

    It was a role she occupied once more at the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship Thailand 2004, and although Brazil returned home in fourth place, Marta's stunning individual performances earned her the adidas Golden Ball award.

    A brilliant 12 months was capped by her third place at the 2004 FIFA World Player Gala. A year later she had climbed into second place, duly completing her rise to the top in 2006.

Editor: Gao Ying

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Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2007, 07:36:33 PM »
Marta Vieira da Silva: Pele in skirts

Pele called her "Pele with skirts" and it's hard to argue with the Brazillan legend.

Marta Vieira da Silva guided Brazil to their 1st World Cup final in China on Thursday. The 21-year-old is the tournament's top scorer with 7 goals and is also Brazil's all-time top scorer at the World Cup with 9 goals.

Pele had also conceded that Marta had better legs than him and while that may have been a joke, those very legs have guided Brazil to a silver medal at the 2004 Athens Olympics and a Gold at this year's PAN American Games.

However for Marta, her two greatest achievements are, winning the Women Footballer of the year award in 2006 and becoming the 1st woman player to imprint her footmarks at the Estadio Maracana, the temple of Brazilian football, where she joined legends such as Zico, Garrincha, Ronaldo and Pele himself.

Meanwhile, what could turn out to be her biggest achievement would be if Brazil go on to win their 1st ever women's world cup title. But for that they have to get past defending champions Germany in the final on Sunday in Shanghai.

http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/showsports.aspx?id=SPOEN20070027652&ch=9/28/2007%2011:09:00%20PM

Offline protocol69

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Re: Marta
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2007, 07:41:30 AM »
Despite missing the penalty yesterday, Marta is not only the greatest female player ever but is well up there with the likes of Pele, Zidane and Maradona. Pure class on and off the ball and shows great humility unlike the english player Kelly Smith. In interviews she shares all the credit with her team mates, which is a sign of a level headed player. Marta will be on top for years to come and i will admiring her skills and talents like i do Roger Federer and Tiger Woods as i know for sure i'll be looking a world history.

Offline redrobin

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Re: Marta
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2007, 07:45:46 PM »
Marta: Luck deserted me
Sunday 30 September 2007

Crestfallen after her side's final defeat to Germany, Marta still managed to force a smile on receiving both the adidas Golden Ball and Golden Shoe awards as China 2007's outstanding player and top goalscorer. Even still, the pain of missing out on a winner's medal remained etched on her face, the crushing sense of disappointment deepened by a costly penalty miss that could have levelled the match at 1-1.

Sulking or hiding away is not, however, in the make-up of a player who emerged within minutes of her side's heartbreaking defeat to speak exclusively to FIFA.com.

FIFA.com: So, how do you reflect on the final?
Marta: We fought really hard to reach this final and just getting there was a historic step for us. Unfortunately we paid a heavy price for our mistakes. We weren't clinical in front of goal, my luck deserted me from the penalty spot, we hit the woodwork two or three times and we didn't manage to dictate the tempo of the game. But that's football. Sometimes, however good you are you don't get what you want and today just wasn't our day.

Despite the defeat, you still picked up a silver medal. How much does that mean to you?
It means a lot. We've proven that we're getting better every year despite not having a national league championship in Brazil. The players do everything in their power to keep playing. Some have a club side, others don't and train by themselves. I think that if there were more incentives and support available then Brazil could go even further. We still haven't won anything but we've reached two major finals: the Olympic Games and the World Cup. Now more than ever the Brazilian authorities need to do something for us in return, so we can take on the big teams like Germany and the USA on an equal footing. Those teams have the full support of their countries.

The Brazilian Football Association have announced that in October they intend to hold a women's cup competition, as a forerunner to a future league championship.
It's a good idea. It would be the first step towards a permanent league with seasons lasting seven or eight months. Players need to be able to keep their fitness up.

How does it feel to finish the tournament with the adidas Golden Ball and Golden Shoe in your arms?
I have to share these two trophies with all my team-mates. While they're individual awards I achieved them thanks to the support of all my colleagues. Every one of the players and the coaching staff has a share of these trophies. On a personal note, I'd like to dedicate them to my mother, who helped me and encouraged me to play football.

What are your next objectives?
We now need to lift ourselves up again, look towards the future and keep working hard, because the qualifying matches for the Olympic Games are just around the corner. For me personally, I've now got to go back to Sweden for the closing stages of the league season and then the UEFA Cup qualifying matches. After winning this silver medal I'm even more determined to go back to my club side and finish the year on a high with Umea.

The crowd at the final cheered you throughout the game. What did that mean to you?
It's great having the fans on your side. I know that they appreciate what I do on the pitch, which is always for the good of the team. The Chinese fans have given us a lot of support all the way through the tournament; they've worn Brazil shirts and really roared us on from the stands - it's been wonderful. I'm tremendously grateful and I hope to see them again next year in Beijing.

What would you say to all the girls who have watched you play during this competition?
I'd say to them that if they have a dream, if they enjoy football and really want to play, then they shouldn't give up. Women's football can be a struggle, but us Brazilians are here fighting to open up more opportunities and smooth the path for them.

http://www.fifa.com/womenworldcup/news/newsid=609090.html#marta+luck+deserted

Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2007, 08:50:33 PM »
The female footballer who's better than you

I'm married to an ardent Liverpool fan so, trust me, I get to watch a lot of mediocre football. Like a lot of ex-pats, we spend all weekend glued to the TV, watching Arsenal, Manchester United and Chelsea grind out one-nothings against the stalwart Premier League makeweights.

Now and then, of course, you get a flash of genius, of ability gone berserk. If you're really lucky, you get to see a game that reminds you why you fell in love with football in the first place. And why all the other sports are just sports.

The women's World Cup semi-final between Brazil and the USA was such a game. In the second half Brazil played the sort of football that makes you laugh out loud. The 21-year-old forward Marta stood over the ball, feinting and jinking while American defenders twitched like rabbits. Then she turned it on, ripping the US defence apart again and again with aggression, speed and moments of amazing skill.

There were glimpses of Zola, Best, Henry and Gascoigne. Behind her the rest of the Brazil team fell into an arrogant, relaxed, devastating rhythm. This was football beyond gender. This was magic.

And I must be insane writing this in a public forum. One of the saddest lessons of this women's World Cup is how threatened the men of football-playing nations are by the idea of women playing football. Posters on these pages have snarked, sniggered, chortled, nitpicked and willy-waggled. It's all been a little bit sad.

The idea that the top-flight women's game - given space, time and money, and freed from the talent-wasting sexism and conservatism that blights the sport in backward nations like the UK and Argentina - might one day become at least as entertaining as top-flight men's football terrifies a lot of men. Particularly those who live in societies where football is indivisibly interwoven into notions of masculinity and male superiority.

But then again, this is football - a sport where the world is forever being turned upside down. And while the least insecure and most women-friendly soccer cultures - Scandinavia, Germany and the US - continue to dominate the game, it's macho Brazil that has produced the women's team who have shown us how this game might be played in the future.

Did I mention Marta already? Did I rant a bit? Did I tell you that she plays for a Swedish side and - until last Saturday - hardly anybody in Brazil knew her name? And did I also mention that she could play you off the park? Yes, you. Stop looking around. I mean you.

Because here's the rub. The real reason so many men hate women's football is because they hate the idea that a woman might be better than them. Well tough, Marta is. More than that, she's probably better than at least half the players in the team you support. And she's not the only one. You can uncross your legs now.

If a player of Marta's ability and potential was the product of decades of Brazillian sports equality she'd be remarkable. The fact she's not - she learned her game playing futsal against boys - is astounding. And indicative of a massive pool of untapped talent. The only question worth asking is: how much female talent has world football missed out on thanks to decades of hostility, stupidity and ignorance?

A young American soccer-playing male once told a friend of mine: "Any male player could beat any female player because they're just stronger." A little later he told a story about US women's soccer legend Mia Hamm turning up to a kick-about with members of his men's college team. "None of us could get near her; she was amazing." He had to have the contradiction pointed out to him.

Waggle your willy while you still can.

http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/sport/2007/10/03/the_female_footballer_whos_bet.html

Offline David

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Re: Marta
« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2007, 07:44:38 PM »
Marta stays put in Sweden -- for now

IF THE NEW U.S. WOMEN'S pro league scheduled to launch in 2009 is to have any chance of getting off the ground, an essential first step is to sign the great young Marta, who scored two goals against the USA in Brazil's 4-0 win in the semifinals of the 2007 Women's World Cup.

According to Swedish newspaper Expressen, Marta, who's been dubbed the Pele of women's soccer for her extraordinary skills and scoring ability, was offered the equivalent of 7 million Swedish kronor ($1.1 million) for seven seasons by AEG to play for its Los Angeles team in the proposed league, but she re-signed with her Swedish club, Umea, for the 2008 season.

Umea agreed to double Marta's monthly salary of 50,000 kronor ($187,000 per year) to remain in Sweden. Umea recently captured its third straight Swedish league title.

Marta, who joined Umea in 2004, is one of five foreigners at the Swedish club along with Brazil teammate Elaine, Norwegians June Pederson and Lisa Klaveness and Swiss Ramona Bachmann.

Marta's two goals Saturday in Umea's 5-3 win at Djurgarden in their Damallsvenskan finale gave her 25 goals for the season.

Clubs in the 12-team Damallsvenskan, which plays a 22-game season, attract many of the world's top players.

http://www.socceramerica.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=Articles.showArticleHomePage&art_aid=24303