Author Topic: Pathways after RTC: trialling with 15/16yr old as opposed to 16/17 yr olds  (Read 788 times)

Offline Welsh May

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I wondered how your daughters are finding trials at the senior level as this year the girls are a year younger than before. How have the supposed pathways worked for you?. Having watched trials now, in some ways the younger RTC girls appear to do very well as they have strong technique mostly and are energetic. On the other hand it also can get quite physical in a way that's not been apparent before... partly because RTC games rarely produced yellow cards, some of the older girls are rough rather than skilled, there's a worldly wiseness to some of the older players and I think this makes the younger players look young ........ are there expectations that RTC players should make the pathway into WPL, WSL etc clubs over more experienced not necessarily better players ...... 50 triallists at clubs for one team, is that a lot? Will clubs take xx players, what's the norm?, we felt informed about RTC processes but this is vague?, should we be asking what gaps there are and what positions?, Would appreciate some thoughts on what you're watching.... why you've taken the route you've chosen .....  So many questions ...... Thanks 

Offline Kelly

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My daughter left the old Coe system last year age 16. She was quickly snapped up by a premier league side. She was clearly a more skilled player than some of the older girls already signed. Her first few matches she kept the bench warm as preference was given to older less fit more physical players. She played a few the times for the development squad but the level was poor due to a mixture off levels and abilities. My advice is look for a wsl development squad and avoid the premier league which is full of women in their 20's keep with girls of a similar age

coey

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playing time is the most important , wsl squads of 40, known a player get rewarded with 4 games one season having been with club since 9.
be prepared to move every season .

Offline Welsh May

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Thank you that's really useful. I think we were thinking it was better that she was playing the match, because you simply cant keep match fitness if you don't get match time, seems obvious but ..... and we're looking at the USA longer term and what she does now matters, not seen an American players yet who doesn't look energetic and athletic ......

Offline RFA

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My advice would be to get into WSL team if you can but WPL is also fine. WSL development is not always great either, I hear of girls playing for a WSL development teams who also dual registered with other clubs just to get more match time. WPL is a good level to learn open age football, the games can be of variable quality and sometimes very physical but I could have said that about academy games on more than a few occasions. Some academy/RTC players may find it too hard initially especially in some positions and some coaches don't like risking 16 year olds unless they have to. I would recommend getting first team football at a club lower down the league rather that getting ten minutes match time every now and then or playing for the reserves of a higher placed club. Look at several clubs, ask the coach about younger players and look at the stats for last season on FA Full Time. Did the coach play the younger ones regularly or did they only get the last 10 minutes of games ? Loads of WPL teams will be starting their summer friendlies in the coming weeks, go and watch them play, see if you think your daughter could command a place. Also be realistic, if your daughter is a striker and they have a 30 goals a year 25 year old srtiker, you may find it difficult to get a starting place. Whilst many WPL will have finished their trials by now, they will usually be happy to look at players at any time.

Offline andydinger

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When moving on from an RTC the most important thing is joining a side/club with a development ethos where you won't be sitting on the bench every week. This means doing your homework on the coaching and management structure and meeting the staff. Preferably do this before the trials (e.g. attend a home game or 2 in the previous season) so you know them and they know you before the decisions need to be made.

In my experience a couple of the WSL "Development" sides are even worse at developing their youngsters than some WPL sides. However, in general, if you can get reasonable game time as a WSL club, the training and support environment will be better than that at most WPL clubs. There is a lot more variability in WPL clubs so you do have to choose carefully. Some are very focused on winning with what they have this season rather than worrying too much about the future. But there are a few out there (mostly with good Junior or even RTC programmes of their own) to whom player development is everything. Even at 16 a good quality player should be able to compete (with a bit of match practice under her belt) with 20-somethings. If they can't then it's unlikely any WPL or WSL club will be that interested in them.

coey

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all good comments, what it does show is what a shambles the pathway exit is, there needs to more alignment with rtc / wsl and wpl

Offline RFA

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Yes it's a shambles but it was last year as well. I remember quoting from an article last year that Baroness Sue Campbell had some "tremendous ideas which she is formulating at the moment". Still waiting unless I have missed something ..........

Offline Welsh May

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Daughter made choice to go to WSL development team, not yet overly impressed sadly, choosing older players, youngsters sitting on bench, weird choices on who plays and where, no obvious strikers in squad?. Hoping it will change over the next few weeks..... However couple of questions, I assume she a) can dual sign so when we know she is not playing she may have an option to get some game time elsewhere and b) if we decided to leave there is a specific process we should be following, we don't have to wait for a specific window? Any advice welcome. Thanks

Offline croc

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Ask the club - they may have a policy on it.   I know Derby encourage their u18s to double sign but WSL sides being bigger outfits may not.

It's certainly not against FA rules to play Saturdays and Sundays and you can sign for two sides on the same day at different levels though there are restrictions on that.  Find out if any of the other players play elsewhere.